The Historic Hermann-Grima House

December 12th, 2006 · No Comments

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Hermann-Grima House, French Quarter, New Orleans

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Hermann-Grima House, French Quarter, New Orleans

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Looking at the Slave Quarters, French Quarter, New Orleans

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The only functional 1830s outdoor kitchen in the French Quarter

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Hermann-Grima House, French Quarter, New Orleans

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Hermann-Grima House, French Quarter, New Orleans

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Slave Bedroom, French Quarter, New Orleans

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Hermann-Grima House, French Quarter, New Orleans

I was just wandering in the French Quarter and came across this historic house that was giving tours. It was cheap and I had time, plus, I’m not sure why but I really like seeing how people lived in past times (Pabst Mansion, Mount Vernon).

This was the Hermann-Grima house, named for the 2 families that lived there, the Hermanns first then the Grimas. From their website

Built in 1831, HERMANN-GRIMA HOUSE is one of the most significant residences in New Orleans. This handsome Federal mansion with its courtyard garden boasts the only horse stable and functional 1830s outdoor kitchen in the French Quarter.

Painstakingly restored to its original splendor through archaeological studies and careful review of the building contract and inventories, the museum complex accurately depicts the gracious lifestyle of a prosperous Creole family in the years from 1830 to 1860.

Most of the people on the tour were fresh off a cruise boat that had just been in the Caribbean, but originated in London. I think. They were all British, for sure. As with most historic house tours, we couldn’t take photos inside the main house. We were allowed to once we were out in the courtyard, a feature not uncommon to houses in New Orleans. We were also able to take a few photos in the structure separate from the main house. This was the slave quarter and also where the kitchen was located. Interesting side note: Many of the slave quarters in New Orleans that still exist are rented apartments and the real estate listings still call them “slave quarters.”

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